Stanford commencement speech by Atul Gawande  JUN 24 2010

Here's what the New Yorker writer and doctor told the graduating class of the Stanford School of Medicine.

Half the words you now routinely use you did not know existed when you started: words like arterial-blood gas, nasogastric tube, microarray, logistic regression, NMDA receptor, velluvial matrix.

O.K., I made that last one up. But the velluvial matrix sounds like something you should know about, doesn't it? And that's the problem. I will let you in on a little secret. You never stop wondering if there is a velluvial matrix you should know about.

Since I graduated from medical school, my family and friends have had their share of medical issues, just as you and your family will. And, inevitably, they turn to the medical graduate in the house for advice and explanation.

I remember one time when a friend came with a question. "You're a doctor now," he said. "So tell me: where exactly is the solar plexus?"

I was stumped. The information was not anywhere in the textbooks.

"I don't know," I finally confessed.

"What kind of doctor are you?" he said.

(via snarkmarket)

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