kottke.org posts about seinfeld

The economics of SeinfeldDec 01 2014

Scenes from Seinfeld can help illustrate economic concepts like incentives, thinking at the margin, and common resources. For instance, in The Strike from season nine (the episode that popularized Festivus), Elaine angles for a free sandwich:

Elaine has eaten 23 bad sub sandwiches, and if she eats a 24th, she'll get one free. She is determined to do it, even though Jerry advises her to ignore sunk costs and walk away.

See also the economics of The Simpsons.

Jerry Seinfeld will give you an answerJan 07 2014

Jerry Seinfeld did an AMA (Ask Me Anything) at Reddit yesterday. His answers are real, and they're spectacular.

Q: Where did the idea of, in Seinfeld, your character being a comedian for a profession, but be the straight man for your friends, come from? I always thought that juxtapositioning for the show was genius.

A: Very good observation and analysis on your part, Baxter. You are truly exhibiting a good comedic eye. The reason I would play straight was it was funnier for the scene. And very few people have ever remarked on this, because it was a conscious choice of mine, only because I knew it would make the show better, and I didn't care who was funny as long as somebody was funny and that the show was funny. So you have hit upon one of the great secret weapons of the Seinfeld series, was that I had no issue with that.

I have seen every episode of the show at least twice and never realized this. Gold, Jerry! Gold!

ps. Favorite episode of Seinfeld? Aside from the nearly perfect The Contest, I'll go with The Marine Biologist. If I ever decide to be an actor, my audition tape will be me telling George's whale rescue story:

(via @gavinpurcell)

Seinfeld theme slowed downJun 17 2013

If you slow down the Seinfeld theme by 1200%, it sounds like the soundtrack to a bad 80s sci-fi movie.

You may also enjoy Justin Bieber at 800% slower.

All of Jerry's best girlsMay 03 2013

Photographer Richard Prince took photographs of the 57 girlfriends Jerry Seinfeld had on the show and turned it in to the below composite.

Jerry's girls

See also Jason Salavon's work. (via @sippey)

Update: Max points out I may have misread the article and these 57 girlfriends are not necessarily Jerry's only. Supporting this is Sarah Silverman's inclusion in the composite even though she's was a love interest of Kramer's.

Seinfeld and NYCMay 03 2013

A list of the most New York episodes of Seinfeld.

4. "The Rye" (Season 7, Episode 11)

This episode's titular breadstuff-which Jerry steals from an old lady who refuses to sell it to him, even for 50 bucks-supposedly comes from Schnitzer's, a great New York bakery name if we've ever heard one. The real place was called Royale Kosher Bake Shop. Unfortunately, it's now closed. A Jenny Craig branch stands in its place at 237 W. 72nd St. Also in this episode: Kramer leads Beef-a-Reno-fueled hansom cab rides through Central Park. His skills as a tour guide are questionable, though, as his historical "facts" are impressively inaccurate. For example, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux-not former New York Yankee Joe Pepitone-designed the park.

Already good, Seinfeld got 100 times better when I moved to NYC and got 10 more of the jokes per episode.

People you didn't know were on SeinfeldAug 03 2012

If you're anything like me, you take things like 34 People You Probably Didn't Know Were On Seinfeld as a challenge. It's been awhile, but I've seen every episode of that show (most of them at least twice) so I thought this would be easy but I totally had forgotten or didn't realize that Jon Favreau, Catherine Keener, Amanda Peet, Denise Richards, and James Spader were on the show. Guess I'm not the Seinfeld fan I thought I was.

Seinfeld's sneakers, a complete guideMay 24 2011

Jerry Seinfeld seemingly wore a different pair of sneakers (mostly Nikes) on his TV show each week...here are 50 pages of analysis of Jerry's shoe choices. For 90s athletic shoe and Seinfeld superfans only. (via @cory_arcangel)

The economics of SeinfeldNov 12 2010

Dozens of scenes from Seinfeld used to explain economic concepts. For instance, in an episode from season five:

George thinks he has been offered a job, but the man offering it to him got interrupted in the middle of the offer, and will be on vacation for the next week. George, unsure whether an offer has actually been extended, decides that his best strategy is to show up. If the job was indeed his, this is the right move. But even if the job is not, he believes that the benefits outweigh the costs.

Economic concepts touched on: cost-benefit analysis, dominant strategy, and game theory. (via what i learned today)

Seinfeld fictional filmsJul 17 2008

A list of the fictional films referred to in Seinfeld. (thx, nicholas)

Noted food scientist Harold McGee takes aJan 30 2008

Noted food scientist Harold McGee takes a look at the microbiological consequences of double dipping a chip into a bowl of dip.

Prof. Paul L. Dawson, a food microbiologist, proposed it after he saw a rerun of a 1993 "Seinfeld" show in which George Costanza is confronted at a funeral reception by Timmy, his girlfriend's brother, after dipping the same chip twice.

Patrick Pittman makes a good case forSep 23 2005

Patrick Pittman makes a good case for Homicide: Life on the Streets being the best TV show ever. I loved Homicide and am convinced it would have found a great audience in this age of TiVo and quick-to-DVD (it was a difficult show to catch on Friday nights). Re: best TV ever, The Simpsons, Seinfeld, The Sopranos, Six Feet Under, and M*A*S*H have to be near the top of the list...what are your favorites?

Tags related to seinfeld:
TV Seinfeld lists economics Jerry Seinfeld

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