Killer carnivorous plants  FEB 19 2010

Writing for National Geographic, Carl Zimmer on the fascinating plants that eat animals. Like the Venus flytrap, "an electrical plant":

When an insect brushes against a hair on the leaf of a Venus flytrap, the bending triggers a tiny electric charge. The charge builds up inside the tissue of the leaf but is not enough to stimulate the snap, which keeps the Venus flytrap from reacting to false alarms like raindrops. A moving insect, however, is likely to brush a second hair, adding enough charge to trigger the leaf to close.

Volkov's experiments reveal that the charge travels down fluid-filled tunnels in a leaf, which opens up pores in cell membranes. Water surges from the cells on the inside of the leaf to those on the outside, causing the leaf to rapidly flip in shape from convex to concave, like a soft contact lens. As the leaves flip, they snap together, trapping an insect inside.

See also the accompanying photo gallery.

Read more posts on kottke.org about:
biology   Carl Zimmer

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