Internet in the time of VHSNOV 17

Andy Baio digitized some early 90s videos about the internet and put them up on YouTube.

Bonus from 1999: Beginners Guide To The Internet Starring John Turturro.

Especially Puglia, fresh extra virgin olive oil straight from Italy

At a conference recently, a friend of mine started talking about olive oil. According to my friend's partner, who had studied the olive oil industry, there are two main factors in choosing great extra virgin olive oil. First, you need to make sure it's genuine olive oil; some producers fraudulently substitute other oils. Second, you want your oil to be as fresh as possible. The Especially Puglia project is giving you a chance to buy fresh unadulterated olive oil straight from a family farm in the Puglia region of Italy.

The main reward on offer is the adoption of an olive tree, for which you get 3 liters of freshly pressed extra virgin olive oil, a ceramic bottle, and an adoption certificate. They've set an aggressive goal to get this oil shipped out in time for the holidays (but they caution against harvest and shipping delays, so grain of salt and all that), and the adoption option would make a great holiday gift. But you can also order a 250mL sample size if 3L is too much. And for the high rollers, you can travel to witness next year's harvest and stay in the family's B&B right on the farm.

I don't think I've ever had super fresh olive oil before, so I'm excited to try this out. The number of trees on the farm limits the quantity of olive oil available through this campaign, so pledge your support for Especially Puglia's fresh extra virgin olive oil before it's all gone.

_____ and JuliaNOV 17

Nora Ephron's movie Julie & Julia is based on a book by Julie Powell about her making every recipe in Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Some genius took the movie and cut all the Julie parts out of it, leaving just a movie about the life of Julia Child starring Meryl Streep.

Update: Well, that was fast...got taken down already.

Update: Looks like someone did a similar cut three months ago, Julia Sans Julie:

Let's see how long this one lasts. (via ★interesting & @ChadwickSevern)

The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical ReproductionNOV 17

Last year, Greenheart Games released a game called Game Dev Tycoon in which you run a company that makes video games. As an experiment, they secretly released a cracked version of the game for pirates to download...with one small difference: players in the cracked version would always go bankrupt because of piracy issues.

The cracked version is nearly identical to the real thing except for one detail... Initially we thought about telling them their copy is an illegal copy, but instead we didn't want to pass up the unique opportunity of holding a mirror in front of them and showing them what piracy can do to game developers. [...] Slowly their in-game funds dwindle, and new games they create have a high chance to be pirated until their virtual game development company goes bankrupt.

Did the pirates learn anything or feel bad? Not really:

Pirates On Piracy

(via @djacobs)

0h h1NOV 17

0hh1

0h h1 is a super simple Sudoku-type game where you need to keep the number of blue and red tiles in each row and column the same. I don't know how people keep coming up with such simple games that are still challenging...you'd think they'd all have been invented by now. (via waxy)

SerialNOV 14

I look forward to every Thursday in a way that I don't remember awaiting the release of an episode of anything recently. There's something very intimate about someone telling you a story that close to your ears.

That's Jason Reitman echoing the thoughts of the many listeners who have turned Serial -- a new podcast from the producers of This American Life -- into the fastest growing podcast ever. Twenty years ago, we were all hooked on TV and radio. Twenty years of technology advances later, we're all hooked on TV and radio. Content is king.

For those who are already knee deep in the Serial serial, Vox has a complete guide to every person in the podcast.

Syndicated from NextDraft. Subscribe today or grab the iOS app.

Posters for imagined movie sequelsNOV 14

Iron Giants Poster

I am loving these posters for non-existent movie sequels, but the names might be even better. A sampling:

Fight Club: The 2nd Rule
Bigger Trouble in Little China
Spaceballs III: The Search for Spaceballs II
Titanic 2: Above Zero

Prints are available for all of these. (via @cabel)

Cooking the Alinea cookbookNOV 14

Allen Hemberger cooked his way through one of the most complex cookbooks out there, the Alinea cookbook. Aside from the chefs who work in the kitchen there, Hemberger's probably the only person to have made every single recipe. These recipes aren't easy; look at the last one he prepared...he even struggled to find the correct ingredients.

Should I be disturbed or thankful that I've never been that passionate about anything ever?

Let's Just Say It: Women Matter More Than Fetuses DoNOV 14

In The New Republic, Rebecca Traister says when talking about abortion, the rights of the mother should trump those of the fetus.

To me, abortion belongs to the same category as the early Cesarean I will need to undergo because of previous surgeries. That is to say, it is a crucial medical option, a cornerstone in women's reproductive health care. And during pregnancy, should some medical, economic, or emotional circumstance have caused my fate to be weighed against that of my baby, I believe that my rights, my health, my consciousness, and my obligations to others -- including to my toddler daughter -- outweigh the rights of the unborn human inside me.

(via @mulegirl)

New App FridayNOV 14

Ok, so New App Friday isn't a thing, but it is today! Three apps from pals launched yesterday:

From the crew at Tinybop comes Homes, an app for kids that lets them explore houses from around the world. Their previous apps, Plants and The Human Body, are favorites in our home.

Neven Mrgan and Matt Comi have been working on Space Age for several years and it shows...this game is immaculate. The soundtrack, by Cabel Sasser, is worth a listen on its own.

Wildcard is billed as a better and faster way to use the Web for on your phone. I haven't played with it too much yet, but it seems a lot like RSS for mobile (if that makes any sense). UX was done by Khoi Vinh.

Seeing so many people I know really knocking it out of the iOS park makes me think I should build an app of my own.

The Simpsons and their mathematical secretsNOV 13

Simpsons Math

Acclaimed science and math writer Simon Singh has written a book on the mathematics of The Simpsons, The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets. Boing Boing has an excerpt.

The principles of rubber sheet geometry can be extended into three dimensions, which explains the quip that a topologist is someone who cannot tell the difference between a doughnut and a coffee cup. In other words, a coffee cup has just one hole, created by the handle, and a doughnut has just one hole, in its middle. Hence, a coffee cup made of a rubbery clay could be stretched and twisted into the shape of a doughnut. This makes them homeomorphic.

By contrast, a doughnut cannot be transformed into a sphere, because a sphere lacks any holes, and no amount of stretching, squeezing, and twisting can remove the hole that is integral to a doughnut. Indeed, it is a proven mathematical theorem that a doughnut is topologically distinct from a sphere. Nevertheless, Homer's blackboard scribbling seems to achieve the impossible, because the diagrams show the successful transformation of a doughnut into a sphere. How?

Although cutting is forbidden in topology, Homer has decided that nibbling and biting are acceptable. After all, the initial object is a doughnut, so who could resist nibbling? Taking enough nibbles out of the doughnut turns it into a banana shape, which can then be reshaped into a sphere by standard stretching, squeezing, and twisting. Mainstream topologists might not be thrilled to see one of their cherished theorems going up in smoke, but a doughnut and a sphere are identical according to Homer's personal rules of topology. Perhaps the correct term is not homeomorphic, but rather Homermorphic.

The United States of IgnoranceNOV 13

According to a recent survey1 of citizens in 14 countries, the United States ranks second in the amount of ignorance about things like teenage birth rates, unemployment rates, and immigration. Only Italians were more clueless. You can take a version of the test yourself and then view the results (results for the US only). Some of the more notable results:

- Americans guessed that the unemployment rate is 32%, instead of the actual rate of 6%.

- While 1% of the US population identifies as Muslim, Americans guessed 15%. 15!

- 70% of Americans guessed the US murder rate was rising. It has decreased by more than half since 1992.

- Americans guessed that almost 24% of girls aged 15-19 give birth each year. Actually, 3.1%.

Then again, what do Americans hear about constantly on the news? Unemployment, Muslims & immigration, murder, and teen pregnancy. It's little wonder the guesses on those are so high.

  1. As you know, survey results are to be taken with a grain of salt.

The truth about cast ironNOV 13

At Serious Eats, Kenji López-Alt sets the record straight about some misconceptions people have about cast iron pans.

The Theory: Seasoning is a thin layer of oil that coats the inside of your skillet. Soap is designed to remove oil, therefore soap will damage your seasoning.

The Reality: Seasoning is actually not a thin layer of oil, it's a thin layer of polymerized oil, a key distinction. In a properly seasoned cast iron pan, one that has been rubbed with oil and heated repeatedly, the oil has already broken down into a plastic-like substance that has bonded to the surface of the metal. This is what gives well-seasoned cast iron its non-stick properties, and as the material is no longer actually an oil, the surfactants in dish soap should not affect it. Go ahead and soap it up and scrub it out.

I have two cast iron pans, including this skillet I use almost exclusively for making the world's best pancakes. Although, after hearing from Kenji that vintage cast iron pans can be slight better than modern pans, I might seek a replacement on Etsy. See also how to season a cast iron pan.

What book changed your mind?NOV 12

Changing your mind about something significant as an adult can be very difficult. For many, ideas are identity, and the particular set of ideas you currently possess got you where you are today, so why switch it up? The Chronicle Review recently asked a group of scholars which non-fiction book "profoundly altered the way they regard themselves, their work, the world". Law professor William Ian Miller had this to say:

No nonfiction books in the past 30 years have transformed me. Some have taught me things, made me hold their authors in deep respect (Bartlett, Bynum). Some have moved me greatly (some of the better soldier memoirs). But knocked me off my horse on the way to Damascus? Nope.

I am 68; if you had asked me the question about a self-transforming book when I was 19, I would have had to say just about half of the ones I read. You could say these books changed my mind, but my mind was pretty much a tabula rasa when I was in my first year of college. Rather they made my mind.

The Great WarNOV 12

The Great War is a video documentary series on YouTube that covers World War I. The series will air each week over the next four years with each 6-10 minute episode covering a week's worth of the war 100 years after it happened.

What an ambitious project. They're currently up to week 15 of the war, when the Ottoman Empire enters the fray. (via @garymross)

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